Hard work

Today I read a whole slew of articles (and even a short book!) on Jon Fosse, trying to fill the gaps in my knowledge of Fosse scholarship for the article. It really helped. It was a hard day; I felt kind of panicked about getting through everything and making sense of it, and I didn’t really have any time to work on the writing until this evening. But after a solid session of revisions, the article is starting to fall into place more and more. It’s going to have a works cited list a mile long, though!

One of my problems is that the reviewer said I relied way too much on other scholarship to make my argument (I guess I came across as the Frankenstein monster, sewn together from various sources and not very elegant). So on the one hand I need to back up what I say about Fosse by referring to more scholarship (more quotes), and I need to frame my analysis within an identifiable theoretical framework (more quotes) while on the other hand I need to put forward my own voice and ideas more prominently and not rely so heavily on other scholars (fewer quotes). D’oh! So this evening I focused on trying to flesh out what I say about the textual examples I’m using. I figure if I expand each of them even a little bit it will shift the overall balance. The problem then becomes that the article starts to get really long. Argh. It’s such hard work to write a really good scholarly article…

WORDS WRITTEN: who’s counting? There are already too many!

Advertisements

2 responses to “Hard work

  1. “on the other hand I need to put forward my own voice and ideas more prominently and not rely so heavily on other scholars (fewer quotes)”

    Making your own voice and ideas more prominent may not necessarily mean fewer quotes. It may mean changing the way you frame quotes, weave them together, and embed them among your own ideas. I think of it like all my sources are my guests at a tea party, and I’m the Queen. I get to manage who says what in response to whom, and everything anyone says has to relate to my ideas, because it’s my party, and I’m the Queen. 😉

  2. An excellent point, Kate. To continue the Frankenstein metaphor, it’s all about the suturing, not necessarily how many parts there are…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s